Today any hardware store has alternatives, typically with sharper threads and uniform body diameters.

A few decades ago there was one basic style; today any hardware store has alternatives, typically with sharper threads and uniform body diameters.

08/mar/2016 09.17.57 ConcreteNails Contatta l'autore

Questo comunicato è stato pubblicato più di 1 anno fa. Le informazioni su questa pagina potrebbero non essere attendibili.

Increasingly by style of screw. A few decades ago there was one basic style; today any hardware store has alternatives, typically with sharper threads and uniform body diameters.

Stringing all these parameters together, one might buy, for example, a box of one hundred 3½ inch #18 flat head Phillips wood screws.

The length of a wood screw is measured from the tip of the point to the surface of the material into which the screw is driven, which is the head's widest part. So the length of a flat head wood screw is measured from the tip to the top of the head, but the length of a round head screw is measured from the tip to the bottom of the head.

In the common wood screw the thread extends 2/3rds of the length of the screw. Some other types (such as sheet metal and dry wall screws) are threaded all the way to the head.

Also in reference to threads you will see "8-32". This is the common knob and pull screw thread. The "8" refers to the size (diameter) of the screw, and the "32" means it has 32 threads to the inch. Most of the screws for mounting hinges are self-tapping (they tap their own mating threads in wood) type AB (they have more threads per inch and are more effective in brittle materials like wood than Type A)

Wood screws are usually made of hardened steel, but are often found in brass and stainless steel. Some may have coatings to help prevent corrosion, but be aware that those coatings may stain some types of wood.

For many years American wood screws were made to two different standards, one a series that originated with the American Screw Co., and the other from the Asa I. Cook Co. In both series, sizes were indicated by gauge numbers, which went up to #30. (see historical table) The overall dimensions in the two series were the same, but the number of threads differed slightly. When an American Standard for wood screws was adopted, most of the diameters were within a few thousandths of an inch of the old dimensions, but the sizes extended only to #24. For the current body diameters of the various gauges, see the pilot holes table.

Usually slotted or Phillips, but for a fuller discussion see screw drive systems.For more nformatioon ,click www.din571.com

blog comments powered by Disqus
Comunicati.net è un servizio offerto da Factotum Srl