PRN: Global Cancer Immunotherapy Report 2017: Building on Initial Successes to Improve Clinical Outcomes - Research and Markets

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Global Cancer Immunotherapy Report 2017: Building on Initial Successes to Improve Clinical Outcomes - Research and Markets

 
[18-April-2017]
 

DUBLIN, Apr. 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ --

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Cancer Immunotherapy: Building on Initial Successes to Improve Clinical Outcomes" report to their offering.

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This new report includes an updated discussion of approved and clinical stage agents in immuno-oncology, including recently-approved agents. It also addresses the means by which researchers and companies are attempting to build on prior achievements in immuno-oncology to improve outcomes for more patients. Some researchers and companies refer to this approach as immuno-oncology 2.0. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), in its 12th Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer (2017), named Immunotherapy 2.0 as its Advance of the Year.

Nevertheless, metastatic melanoma remains incurable. Furthermore, in many studies in advanced melanoma and other cancers, only a minority of patients have benefited from immunotherapy treatments. Researchers and companies are therefore looking for ways to build on the initial successes of the immuno-oncology field to improve outcomes for more patients, hence the need for an immuno-oncology 2.0.  Agents that are intended to! improve the results of treatment with agents like checkpoint inhibitors may also be referred to as second-wave immuno-oncology agents.

As discussed in this report, researchers have found that checkpoint inhibitors produce tumor responses by reactivating TILs (tumor infiltrating lymphocytes)-especially CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. This key observation is perhaps the most important factor driving development of second-wave immuno-oncology strategies. As a result, researchers have been developing biomarkers that distinguish inflamed (i.e., TIL-containing) tumors-which are susceptible to checkpoint inhibitor therapy-from cold tumors, which are not. They have also been working to develop means to render cold tumors inflamed, via treatment with various conventional therapies and/or development of novel agents. These studies are the major theme of second-wave immuno-oncology, or immuno-oncology 2.0.

Highlights of this Report Include:

- Approvals of! checkpoint inhibitors
- Biomarkers for checkpoint inhibi! tor trea tments
- Approved and clinical-stage immunotherapy biologics other than checkpoint inhibitors
- Immunotherapy with TIL cells
- Commercialization of TIL therapy
- Adoptive immunotherapy with genetically engineered T cells bearing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs)
- Manufacturing issues with CAR T-cell therapies
- General conclusions on the progress of cellular immunotherapy
- Outlook for cancer immunotherapy

Key Topics Covered:

1: Introduction

- The early history of cancer immunotherapy - Coley's toxins
- Cytokines as immunomodulatory drugs
- Interleukin-2
- Alpha-interferons
- Interleukin-12
- Interleukin-12 as a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity
- Investigation of interleukin-12 as an anticancer therapeutic
- Interleukin-10
- Interleukin-15
- Admune/Novartis' heterodimeric IL-15:IL-15Ra (hetIL-15)
- Altor's ALT-803
- Conclusions: Cytokine-! based immunotherapies for cancer

2: What are immune checkpoints?

- CTLA-4 blocking agents
- Ipilimumab
- Tremelimumab
- PD-1 blocking agents
- Nivolumab
- Combination therapy of nivolumab plus ipilimumab in melanoma
- Pembrolizumab
- Pembrolizumab as a first-line treatment for advanced NSCLC
- Pembrolizumab in colorectal carcinoma with mismatch-repair deficiency
- Studies of pembrolizumab in combination immunotherapies
- PDR001
- PD-L1 blocking agents
- Atezolizumab
- Atezolizumab in treatment of urothelial carcinoma
- Atezolizumab for the treatment of NSCLC
- Atezolizumab in treatment of other solid tumors
- Other anti-PD-L1 mAb agents
- Durvalumab
- Avelumab
- Anti-LAG-3 agents
- anti-TIM-3
- NewLink Genetics' small-molecule IDO pathway inhibitors and checkpoint inhibition
- Infinity's PI3K? inhibitor IPI-549 for modulation of immune suppressio! n in tumors
- Biomarkers for checkpoint inhibitor treatme! nts
- Target biomarkers
- Genetic biomarkers
- Immunological biomarkers
- Use of biomarker tests in treatment with checkpoint inhibitors
- Checkpoint inhibitors plus radiation therapy
- Checkpoint inhibitors plus targeted therapies
- Checkpoint inhibitors with cytotoxic chemotherapies
- Discussion

3: Immune Agonists

- Celldex Therapeutics' Varlilumab (CDX-1127)
- OX40 agonists
- MedImmune/AZ's OX40 agonist program
- Roche/Genentech's OX40 agonist program
- Nektar Therapeutics/BMS's NKTR-214, a CD122 agonist
- Glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related (GITR) protein agonist (Leap Therapeutics' TRX518)
- Conclusions

4: Bispecific antibodies

- Marketed bispecific antibody agents
- Catumaxomab
- Blinatumomab
- Bispecific antibodies as an alternative to CAR-T cells
- Xencor's cross-linking monoclonal antibody (XmAb) bispecific platform technology
- Regeneron's ! native human immunoglobulin-format bsAb, REGN1979
- Roche/Genentech's full-length bsAbs: Generated using CrossmAb technology
- MacroGenics' MGD007: Generated using dual-affinity re-targeting (DART) technology
- Conclusions

5: Therapeutic Anticancer Vaccines and Oncolytic viruses

- Introduction
- Cancer vaccines-a field rife with clinical failures
- Why has the cancer vaccine field been so prone to clinical failure?
- Marketed therapeutic cancer vaccines and oncolytic virus therapies
- Dendreon/Valeant's sipuleucel-T
- Amgen's talimogene laherparepvec (T-Vec)/Imlygic
- Therapeutic cancer vaccines and oncolytic virus therapies in clinical development
- Celldex's CDX-1401
- Bavarian Nordic's PROSTVAC-VF
- Argos Therapeutics' AGS-003
- Sydys Corporation's CVac
- Aduro Biotech's CRS-207
- TapImmune's TPIV110 HER2/neu and TPIV200 folate receptor alpha multi-epitope vaccines
- Genel! ux's GL-ONC1 oncolytic virus
- Conclusions

6: A! doptive Immunotherapy for Cancer

- Introduction
- Adoptive immunotherapy with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes
- A specific immunodominant mutation in a melanoma patient who had a durable complete remission due to TIL therapy
- Adoptive immunotherapy based on mutation-specific CD4+ T cells in an epithelial cancer
- Successful targeting of KRAS G12D via adoptive immunotherapy in a case of metastatic colorectal cancer
- Dr. Rosenberg's recent studies on neoantigen-reactive TILs for use in adoptive cellular immunotherapy
- Commercializing TIL therapy
- Adoptive immunotherapy with genetically engineered T cells bearing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs)
- Leading clinical programs in CAR T-cell based immunotherapy
- Kite Pharma's KTE-C19 (axicabtagene ciloleucel)
- Novartis' CTL019
- Juno's JCAR015 and other Juno anti-CD19 CARs
- Other CAR T-cell therapies that target hematologic malignancies
- bluebird bio's bb2121! for multiple myeloma
- CAR T-cell therapies that target solid tumors
- Novartis/University of Pennsylvania's CARTmeso
- EGFRvIII CAR T-cell therapies
- Companies developing engineered improvements in CAR T-cell therapy
- Bellicum Pharmaceuticals' technologies for modulation of CAR T-cell therapies
- Cellectis' technologies for design and manufacture of off-the shelf CAR T-cell therapies
- Manufacturing issues with CAR T-cell therapies
- Can bispecific antibodies be competitive with CAR T-cell therapies?
- Adptimmune recombinant TCR clinical candidates
- Kite Pharma recombinant TCR program
- Juno Therapeutics' recombinant TCR program
- Recombinant TCR studies at the NCI
- Conclusions
- Market size estimates for the T-cell therapy market

7: General Conclusions

- Major theme of this report: Immuno-oncology 2.0 or second-wave immuno-oncology
- Approvals of! checkpoint inhibitors
- Biomarkers for checkpoint inhibi! tor trea tments
- Approved and clinical-stage immunotherapy biologics other than checkpoint inhibitors
- Immunotherapy with TIL cells
- Commercialization of TIL therapy
- Adoptive immunotherapy with genetically engineered T cells bearing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs)
- Manufacturing issues with CAR T-cell therapies
- Adoptive immunotherapy via autologous recombinant TCR technology
- General conclusions on the progress of cellular immunotherapy
- Insight Pharma Reports survey on cancer immunotherapy
- Outlook for cancer immunotherapy

For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/rkf8pp/cancer

Media Contact:

Research and Markets
Laura Wood, Senior Manager
press@researchandmarkets.com

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